Breconside

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Alternative Names Brakenside; Breckonside Tower
Site Type FARMHOUSE, FARMSTEAD, TOWER HOUSE
Canmore ID 49732
Site Number NT10SW 2
NGR NT 10797 02191
Council DUMFRIES AND GALLOWAY
Parish MOFFAT
Former Region DUMFRIES AND GALLOWAY
Former District ANNANDALE AND ESKDALE
Former County DUMFRIES-SHIRE
Datum OSGB36 - NGR

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Notes and Activities

Archaeological Notes

NT10SW 2 10797 02191

(NT 1079 0218) Breconside (NR)
OS 6" map, (1965)

Breconside, now a farmhouse, consists of an oblong tower originally built in the last decade of the 16th century (when it stood three storeys and a garret high; its roof level has since been lowered and the crowstepping removed). Alterations and additions were made in the 17th century. The N and E sides of the tower are little altered. A large semi-octagonal stair-tower was inserted in the W side in the 18th century, and large windows were opened on that side in the Victorian period, when a lower extension of a kitchen, two living rooms and a porch was also added. (The spelling of the name of this tower has been altered several times over the years - 'Breconside' was the version authorised in 1980.)
W A J Prevost 1980; RCAHMS 1920; N Tranter 1965

The original tower measures 10.8 m E-W by 6.8 m externally with walls 1.0 m to 1.5 m thick; the vaulted ground floor is divided into two rooms. There is a wheel-staircase in the W corner.
Visited by OS (DWR) 20 January 1972.

Breconside and remains of [NAT] Tower [NR]
OS 1:10,000 map, 1988.

Breckonside Tower. A 16th-century 3-storey tower-house with later alterations and remodelled, perhaps twice in the 19th century, with enlarged windows to S in regular 3-bay arrangement; a mid-19th-century low crow-stepped wing adjoins the E gable. The S elevation has been rendered as ashlar with ashlar margins, the remainder being exposed rubble. There is a full height central semi-octagonal stair turret with tall facetted roof, flanking bipartites at first floor level and single windows above, while a low porch links the turret to the E wing. There are brick end stacks and slated roofs. The ground floor is vaulted and the single openings to the N and S are both probably insertions; the gables and rear wall are otherwise blank except for some blocked openings. The wing has a corniced stack on a crow-stepped plinth over the E wall-head. The building is in neglected condition.
SDD List 1988 (listed 1971; visited 1987).

Incorporated into Breconside farmhouse (18th-century and later), there are the remains of a 16th-century tower-house. Original features are confined to the basement of the house and comprise a vaulted chamber (8m from W to E by 4.4m transversely within walls 1.1m thick), later divided into two compartments by a cross-wall, and a newel-stair (blocked at first-floor level) in the SW angle. The entrance-doorway was adjacent to the stair in the S wall; its lintel remains, in reuse in an 18th-century casement window, and is wrought with a bullnosed moulding and internal check. To the interior, there is evidence of a blocked window in the W wall, an aumbry at the E end of the S wall, and there is a surviving original window in the N wall at ground level. The later house, although dilapidated, is distinguished by its panelling.
Original features include some 18th-century raised-and-fielded panelling (mainly in the window embrasures and shutters), skirting and cornices. 'Brakenside' is on record in 1590.
Visited by RCAHMS (IMS), 15 May 1990.

This small and much-altered tower-house in a valley 3 miles SE of Moffat is probably of late 16th century construction with 17th-century alterations and additions. Breckonside is now a farmhouse.
M Lindsay 1994.

Breconside. Rubble-built three-storey house, perhaps of the mid or later 17th century.
J Gifford 1996.

Listed as tower.
RCAHMS 1997.

 
Books and References

Gifford, J (1996) Dumfries and Galloway, The Buildings of Scotland series London
Page(s): 444 Held at RCAHMS Quick

Lindsay, M (1994) The castles of Scotland, London
Page(s): 96-7 Held at RCAHMS F.5.21.LIN

Maxwell-Irving, A M T (2000) The Border towers of Scotland: their history and architecture: the West March, [S.l.]
Page(s): 89-90 Figs 160-1 Held at RCAHMS F.5.21.MAX

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Charity SC026749